Another book written, and another in the works

I’m very excited about how things are going. This week has been outstanding. I completed my second full length fiction novel, a post-apocalypse tale of survival, earlier in the week, and have been contracted to write a second book for him – originally it was to be a stand-alone novel. My client has told me there will be a third, as well, and I’ll be writing it. I can’t say much about it, given that I’m just the ghostwriter, but I’m really jazzed.

Another client, an agency that uses me to provide their SEO clients with writing services, just hit me with about a dozen new projects. The work is great, but knowing they like my writing and my service is even better.

I’ve had some social media messages asking how one gets a client, and then keeps them. I can understand that – I’ve got almost entirely repeat clients, at this point. The answer to the question is amazingly simple, and I’ll share it with you:

UNDER-PROMISE, OVER-DELIVER.

Yes, it’s that simple. If a client wants 200 words by tomorrow, give it to them today. If you tell them you think you can do five 500-word posts this week, give them 6. Invite them to give you feedback, and be willing to revise a post based on what they say, even if they don’t request a revision/edit. If you tell a client it’ll take X hours but it really takes X+1, put X+1 on your invoice but bill only X hours. If a client has a sudden, urgent project, then drop everything and come through for them (assuming it won’t make you miss deadlines on other contracts…)

One final tip. If a client doesn’t like something about a project you delivered, instead of defending your “golden words”, ask what they didn’t like and offer a free or discounted revision. If you feel that a particular client takes advantage of that, don’t stop giving them amazing service. Ask for a higher billing rate, or stop working with them, again with a professional, friendly note explaining that your client load demands a more competitive rate, to continue servicing them. If they decline, offer to help find a replacement freelancer. They probably won’t need your help, but if they do, then point them towards some other freelancers (assuming you know any, which you should!)

The best way to get repeat business is to make yourself worth it. The best way to get new business is word of mouth.

Anyway, I’m rambling. I do that when I’m excited 🙂

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